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(Source: theenthusiast7, via xfawnx)

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It’s my last day at this job invigilating!

Nearly two months of not having weekends to myself but being vigilant and responsible for these keys and books.

I can’t really complain, I’ve been paid to crochet and read but I’ll be glad to go back to a weekday work and weekend rest routine once my placement starts at the Turnpike.

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indypendent-thinking:

Curators, Whitechapel gallery, London, c.1930

indypendent-thinking:

Curators, Whitechapel gallery, London, c.1930

(via hermionejg)

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Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

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PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

(via ohitsjustkim)

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I have so much I could say about books. I could happily be a booktuber if YouTube still held any appeal to me. But it doesn’t.

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Just finished my 50th book of the year. I’m looking forward to writing about my favourites/least favourites when it gets to late December too.

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I have had two different reactions to my tights today. 

Lady - “Where did you get those tights, my daughter would love those!” 
Bloke - *exaggerated miaow catcall*

:/

I have had two different reactions to my tights today.

Lady - “Where did you get those tights, my daughter would love those!”
Bloke - *exaggerated miaow catcall*

:/

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adventuresofcesium:

remember when Andy scored among the highest ever on the aptitude test for becoming a police officer but then was denied because the interview showed that he was too kind and trusting and empathetic to be a cop

(Source: jesus-frankenstein, via liamdryden)

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wiseyoungravenclaw:

Remus Arthur Potter, you were named after two men who looked out for my safety and cared about my well-being out of altruism and decency rather than because I was a tool for them to use or because I was someone’s son.

(via tikken)

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jean-luc-gohard:

parskis:

I honestly can’t believe this right now. I was complaining to my bf about some Kotex tampons I had used, going on a bit of a rant about how bad they were, and on a whim I decided to go to the website and leave a review so other people who might get them would know better.
I’ve never written a tampon review in my life (it’s not something I ever anticipated doing) so I had a little fun getting very passionate about my thoughts, and then went to submit…. Only to receive the words: ‘Your review text contains inappropriate language.’ I was confused at first, I mean I was pretty emphatic, but I didn’t cuss at all… and then I realized: I had typed the word ‘vagina.’ 

You can’t type the word ‘vagina’ on a TAMPON review because it’s considered inappropriate.

KOTEX, a company that makes OVER A BILLION DOLLARS A YEAR primarily selling products to people with vaginas, thinks that someone typing the word “VAGINA” in a review of a product that goes IN THEIR VAGINA is being inappropriate and needs to be censored.

I retyped “v*gina” with an asterisk like it was a swear word, submitted and it went to preview mode with no problem. But I’m still kind of in shock… Honestly, what is wrong with Kotex that they think they need to protect tampon users from the word ‘vagina’?

If you didn’t think our society’s fear of the vagina was absurd, here you go. It’s cartoonish.

(via eastiewestie)